Facts and Statistics

Browse the facts and statistics of local communities by region and country below:

    Serbia

    Mischa Markow was the first LDS missionary to work in Serbia. He arrived in Beograd in May 1899. Forces of opposition soon turned against him and Markow was banished to Hungary in June 1899 without baptizing anyone.

    The president of the Czechoslovak Mission, Arthur Gaeth, visited Beograd in August 1934, where there were two members of the Church, Sister Evize Vujicic and Brother Mateja Spacek. Gaeth held a worship service with them and four friends. No further missionary work was done in Yugoslavia until the 1970s.

    In October 1974, the First Presidency (the highest governing body of the Church) representative David M. Kennedy visited Beograd to seek recognition for the Church. Shortly thereafter, missionaries serving in Austria began a program to teach Yugoslav émigrés working there with the hope of eventually opening missionary work in Yugoslavia.

    In anticipation of establishing a mission there, the Church called Gustav Salik as mission president and stationed him in Austria near the Yugoslav border in 1975. Salik spent the next year attempting to open the mission, but could not get the necessary permission to work in the country. In 1977, missionaries entered as students. They wore casual dress but could not proselyte. Though they served mostly in Croatia, they also worked in Beograd.

    Lee and Marilyn Manwill arrived in Beograd in January 1983, the first missionary couple to serve full time in that city. The first baptisms were in May of that same year. By November 1983, a branch (small congregation) was organized.

    In June 1991, Slovenia and Croatia declared independence from Yugoslavia. The threat of civil war caused Church leaders to evacuate all missionaries working in the former Yugoslavia on July 1, 1991.

    Four months later, missionaries returned to Beograd. Two months later, the Church purchased a building, the culmination of a five-year effort. On 28 January 1992, the building passed inspection; one of the requirements for an organization’s obtaining legal status which meant that Serbia had officially recognized the Church. Missionaries were then granted permanent visas to work in the country. In February of that year, missionaries opened the second Serbian city, Novi Sad.

    Civil war erupted in 1992. Because communication was better between Budapest and Beograd, responsibility for Serbia was temporarily transferred to the Hungary Budapest Mission in November 1993. Shortly thereafter, missionaries were evacuated to other Central European nations due to rising tensions.

    By the summer of 1995, Serbia was transferred back to the Austria Vienna Mission. Shortly thereafter, Serbia canceled the visas for foreign missionaries. The last two elders left Serbia in September 1995. During the next year, Austria Vienna Mission President Swen R. Swenson visited Church members in Serbia each month. The Church also contributed humanitarian assistance during this time. A tenuous peace was achieved in November 1995 and missionaries re-entered Serbia in June 1996.

    Violence in Kosovo began in 1996. As the violence escalated, missionary work slowed. Missionaries were evacuated from Serbia to Croatia in October 1998. Three weeks later, missionaries were able to return to Serbia.

    This time of growth and missionary work was short lived. In March 1999, violence resumed. Missionaries were evacuated from Serbia shortly before the outbreak. In September 2000, responsibility for Serbia was transferred to the Bulgaria Sofia Mission. And in December 2001, after peace was restored, six missionaries re-entered Serbia.

     

    368

    Total Church Membership

    2

    Family History Centers

    3

    Congregations

    North America

    9,164,419

    Total Church Membership

    191

    Missions

    2,811

    Family History Centers

    18,164

    Congregations

    106

    Temples

    South America

    3,969,757

    Total Church Membership

    94

    Missions

    937

    Family History Centers

    5,527

    Congregations

    17

    Temples

    Europe

    511,491

    Total Church Membership

    44

    Missions

    767

    Family History Centers

    1,452

    Congregations

    12

    Temples

    Asia

    1,132,501

    Total Church Membership

    42

    Missions

    328

    Family History Centers

    1,982

    Congregations

    8

    Temples

    Oceania (Pacific)

    541,968

    Total Church Membership

    18

    Missions

    328

    Family History Centers

    1,243

    Congregations

    10

    Temples

    Africa

    539,524

    Total Church Membership

    31

    Missions

    274

    Family History Centers

    1,792

    Congregations

    3

    Temples

    Worldwide Statistics

    The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has issued the following report concerning the growth and status of the Church:

    Growth of the Church

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was formally organized in a small log cabin in upstate New York in 1830. It took 117 years — until 1947 — for the Church to grow from the initial six members to one million. Learn More

    15,882,417

    Total Church Membership

    188

    Published Languages

    30,304

    Congregations

    Missionary Program

    The Church's missionary program is one of its most recognized characteristics. Mormon missionaries can be seen on the streets of hundreds of major cities in the world. Learn More

    70,946

    Missionaries

    422

    Missions

    15

    Missionary Training Centers

    Humanitarian Services

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints provides relief and development projects for humanitarian purposes in countries all over the world. Learn More

    189

    Countries Receiving Humanitarian Aid (Since 1985)

    10,238

    Welfare Services Missionaries (Incl. Humanitarian Service Missionaries)

    Temples

    Temples are not regular places of Sunday worship for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Learn More

    156

    Temples

    Education

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints emphasizes the importance of continued secular and spiritual education Learn More

    4

    Universities & Colleges

    404,270

    Seminary Students Enrollment

    357,760

    Institute Student Enrollment

    Genealogy

    Genealogy is more than learning about one’s family history for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Latter-day Saints believe families can be together after this life. Learn More

    5,003

    Family History Centers

    138

    Countries with Family History Centers