Payson Utah Temple Dedicated

Payson Utah Temple Dedicated

The 15th temple in Utah and 146th in the world

News Release

Hundreds witnessed the traditional cornerstone ceremony on Sunday, June 7, 2015, of the Payson Utah Temple prior to the temple’s dedication by President Henry B. Eyring, first counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

“We’re grateful to have this temple completed and dedicated this morning," said Elder Kent F. Richards, executive director of the Church's Temple Department. "This temple will remain here in the Payson area as a landmark, as a beautiful emblem of our faith in the Lord Jesus Christ."

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The cornerstone ceremony for a Church temple signifies that the construction is complete and the new temple is ready for dedication. Elder Richards said the cornerstone ceremony is symbolic. “It brings to mind the Savior Jesus Christ being the chief cornerstone in our Church.”

Three dedicatory sessions were broadcast to Latter-day Saint meetinghouses within the temple district. President Eyring presided over and offered dedicatory prayers in the first two sessions; Elder Neil L. Andersen offered the prayer in the final session.

"To me personally, it is a historic event," said Bruce Hiskey who attended the cornerstone ceremony. "In a world that's full of chaos and trouble and challenges, here is a place where [we] can come to feel peace and comfort."

Cornerstone attendee Jenessa Pratt also described the temple as a place of peace. "It's a place of security and a place where you know that no matter what situation in life you are at, you can go there for peace and for answers."

Joining President Eyring were members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, Elders Russell M. Nelson, Dallin H. Oaks and Quentin L. Cook. Other Church leaders included Elders Ronald A. Rasband and Ulisses Soares of the Presidency of the Seventy; Elder Kent F. Richards, a member of the Seventy and executive director of the Church’s Temple Department; Bishop Gérald Caussé of the Presiding Bishopric; and Carol F. McConkie, first counselor in the Young Women general presidency. Members of the temple presidency and the temple matron and her assistants also attended.

Choirs comprised of Latter-day Saints from throughout the temple district provided music for the cornerstone ceremony and dedication.

The Payson Utah Temple is one of 146 operating temples of the Church worldwide and serves more than 78,000 Latter-day Saints from Mapleton to Delta, Utah. It is the 15th temple in the state.

Nearly 13,000 local Latter-day Saint youth celebrated the opening of the temple in a cultural celebration on Saturday, June 6, 2015, in LaVell Edwards Stadium on the Brigham Young University campus in Provo.

“You will never forget the satisfaction as you discovered that through effort and determination you can do more than you thought possible,” said President Eyring during the cultural celebration.

The temple is located in southwestern Payson at 1494 South 930 West and is accessed from the 800 South exit of I-15. It sits on a gently sloping 10.63-acre parcel adjacent to a recently constructed Church meetinghouse. The temple can be easily seen from the freeway.

More than 400,000 people attended the public open house from April 24 through May 23, 2015.

The Payson Utah Temple was announced in January 2010 by Church President Thomas S. Monson. Additional temples have been announced or are under construction in the Utah cities of Provo and Cedar City.

Latter-day Saint temples differ from meetinghouses or chapels where members meet for Sunday worship services. Temples are considered “houses of the Lord” where Jesus Christ’s teachings are reaffirmed through marriage, baptism and other ordinances that unite families for eternity. Inside, members learn more about the purpose of life and make covenants to serve Jesus Christ and their fellow man.

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