First Presidency Letter on Utah Precinct Caucus Meetings

First Presidency Letter on Utah Precinct Caucus Meetings

News Story

The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints issued a letter early in March to be read in all Utah congregations, which encouraged Latter-day Saints to attend their local precinct caucus meetings:

“On Tuesday, March 23, 2010, political parties in Utah will hold precinct caucus meetings. Precinct caucuses are the most fundamental grassroots level of political involvement. They are best served by a broad representation of Utah citizens. Those who attend play a critical role in selecting candidates.

“We ask that local leaders not schedule meetings on that Tuesday evening so that members may attend a caucus meeting. The location of these meetings can be found on the Web sites of the respective political parties.

“Principles compatible with the gospel may be found in the platforms of various political parties. We encourage members to attend their precinct caucus meetings.“

The First Presidency has given this same admonition in the past and encouraged members of the Church to participate, with other good citizens, in the political process as part of their individual civic duty, while the Church itself remains politically neutral.

The Church’s political neutrality statement (found here on Newsroom.lds.org) explains the principles the Church follows with regard to the political process:

The Church does not:

  • Endorse, promote or oppose political parties, candidates or platforms.
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  • Allow its church buildings, membership lists or other resources to be used for partisan political purposes.
  •  
  • Attempt to direct its members as to which candidate or party they should give their votes to. This policy applies whether or not a candidate for office is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
  •  
  • Attempt to direct or dictate to a government leader.

 

The Church does:

  • Encourage its members to play a role as responsible citizens in their communities, including becoming informed about issues and voting in elections.
  •  
  • Expect its members to engage in the political process in an informed and civil manner, respecting the fact that members of the Church come from a variety of backgrounds and experiences and may have differences of opinion in partisan political matters.
  •  
  • Request candidates for office not to imply that their candidacy or platforms are endorsed by the Church.
  •  
  • Reserve the right as an institution to address, in a nonpartisan way, issues that it believes have significant community or moral consequences or that directly affect the interests of the Church.

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